More high schools should start fencing teams. That opinion shouldn’t surprise you on this website, but the stats that we’re using to back up that opinion might.

ScholarshipStats.com published a survey showing the percentage of athletes on high school teams who continue their sport in college.

Guess what? Fencers from high school teams continued fencing on NCAA programs more often than athletes in any other sport.

 

Show me the stats.

Roughly a third of all high school fencers get the opportunity to fence on an NCAA fencing team in college, and roughly one in five get to fence on an NCAA Division 1 fencing team.

BoysGirls
High School Fencers21891774
NCAA Fencers651677
Percentage29.70%38.20%
NCAA Div I16.90%23.20%
NCAA Div II1.30%2.00%
NCAA Div III11.20%12.60%

 

Those stats are impressive on their own, but let’s compare them to a few other choice sports.

High School Girls to College Women

Varsity SportIn College
Fencing38.20%
Ice Hockey23.50%
Soccer10.10%
Golf9.20%
Gymnastics9.00%
Softball8.30%
Average7.90%
Basketball6.40%
Tennis5.00%

 

High School Boys to College Men

Varsity SportIn College
Fencing29.70%
Gymnastics19.10%
Ice Hockey12.30%
Baseball11.50%
Soccer9.10%
Golf8.10%
Football8.00%
Average7.60%
Basketball5.90%
Tennis5.30%
Volleyball4.40%

 

Here’s a visual to go with that.

this chart showing that 30 percent of male high school fencers go on to fence in college is a strong argument for why more high school should start fencing teams Why More High Schools Should Start Fencing Teams in a chart

Scholarships and Pull

For some fencers, the sport can serve as a doorway to higher education. Schools like Columbia offer scholarships to the student athletes on their team who might otherwise struggle to afford the school.

Other Division 1 schools don’t offer scholarships, but their coaches have “pull.” That means that the coaches can help fencers gain entry to the school when the admissions department might not otherwise admit the fencer.

Don’t Forget Club Teams

The data from ScholarshipStats notably does not count college club fencing teams. Club teams don’t offer scholarships, but they offer the fulfillment of continuing to compete in a sport you love and the feeling of community that comes with that.

And the Rising Tide

NCAA Fencing Teams have actually declined over the past three decades, but a growth in high school level programs could help change that.

Does this convince you that high schools should start fencing teams? Tell us in the comments.

Support The Growth of Fencing While Accessing Great Content: Like this article and not already a member of Fencing University? Help us fund the creation of high quality instructional materials and access our premium content by becoming a member of FencingU today! (Free trial offer at the below link!)

https://fencinguniversity.org/free-trial/